Wednesday, September 23, 2009

This Silver, This Surfer!




Season: 1
Episode Number: 2
Season Episode Number: 2
Production Number: 102
Airdate: September 20, 2009

Writer: Mark Hoffmeier
Director: Michael R. Gerard

Voices: Tom Kenny (Iron Man, M.O.D.O.K.), Travis Willingham (Hulk), Dave Boat (Thor, Thing), Alimi Ballard (Falcon), Steve Blum (Wolverine, Abomination), Mikey Kelley (Silver Sufer), Grey DeLisle (Ms. Marvel, Old Lady), Charlie Adler (Doctor Doom), Unknown (Construction Worker).

Plot: After being ridiculed by his teammates, Silver Surfer leaves the Squad and falls into a trap set by Doctor Doom who plans to steal his Cosmic Power to create a fragment of the Infinity Sword!

Review (Warning! Spoilers!): I already feel like I'm getting a hang of this show. Any doubts I had about the humourous versions of these characters are being addressed right off the bat with this episode.

The most drastic change to a character of the main cast has got to be the Silver Surfer, who has gone from stoic, introspective and dignified to clumsy, naive and quick to act without thinking. So it makes sense that the Silver Surfer is featured in the first character driven episode of the series.

I imagine that adults who loved the prime time Muppet Show would have felt the same reservations about Muppet Babies that viewers of this show may feel about these beloved superheroes. But Muppet Babies carved their own path and became a huge success, and I'm guessing that this show will too.

This episode gives us a little backstory: Doom opened up a rift window to retrieve the Infinity Sword and a battle with Iron Man caused the sword to shatter into pieces all over Super Hero City and Villainville.

This is a pretty standard plot for a TV series. Having to collect an undetermined amount of something allows for the series to carry on as long as it wants. Look at Pokémon, they had to collect 120 Pokémon at the start and now they are up to something like 500+ because the show retained its popularity. I'm not saying that the Squad should search for the fractals forever, I'm just saying that it's a good way to keep the show going for a while if they want to.

We meet two members of the Lethal Legion in this episode: Abomination, who is a typical oafish brute, a bit dim but somehow aware of what is going on better than his peers, and M.O.D.O.K. (Metal Organism Designed Only for Kicking-Butt) who has been mocked many times in various outlets such as Twisted Toyfare Theatre and Marvel Super-Heroes: What The--? and gets treated even less seriously here.

I have a feeling that the villains in this show will be the ones that will see the most change. Fans are quite particular about their heroes, but don't seem to mind different incarnations of villains as much. Plus, this show is playing down the killing and carnage so it only makes sense to turn these violent villains into comical characters. Plus, it works for the show.

The Thing makes his first guest starring role with a good design and a character that we are all too familiar with. Good to see him buddies with the Hulk for a change. No other guest stars or cameos (other than Ms. Marvel whom I am assuming is a supporting cast rather than a guest star).

All in all, this series is seriously fun. Lots of laughs and action for this kids, and plenty for the adults and long time comic fans who know their Marvel history to get into. And the animation is really good too! Can't wait for the next one!

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4 comments:

Brian S. said...

151 pokemon, actually. It just makes your point more valid, anyway haha.

The animation really is pretty strong too. They must've gone with a more "high-end" overseas studio this time.

Anonymous said...

So where does "To Err is Superman" fall in place? In the US it aired as episode 2, but it seems they skipped over it in the Canadian airdates.

Mehdi said...

it is so sad
DC fans get "superman/Batman: Public Enemies" and us marvel fans get a garbage like this!

Kurtis said...

To Err is Superhuman is episode four. Each episode's title card features a parody of a famous comic book cover each with a number indicating continuity and This Silver, This Surfer is number 2.